Today marks my one year anniversary working at the music school! It’s been a good year. I’ve learned a lot and it’s amazing what my students have accomplished in that time. 

barcarole:

Igor Stravinsky and Claude Debussy in the latter’s apartment in the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris; photo by Erik Satie, June 1910.


I was all “holy crap,” and then I saw the photo was taken by ERIK SATIE.

barcarole:

Igor Stravinsky and Claude Debussy in the latter’s apartment in the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris; photo by Erik Satie, June 1910.

I was all “holy crap,” and then I saw the photo was taken by ERIK SATIE.

(via dissonanc3)

deceptivelydeeppuddle:

titanicrealtime:

Water-stained violin proven to be the one that played Nearer my God to Thee by Wallace Hartley as the Titanic sank is found. [x]

It is the instrument that he played as the ship went down in the Atlantic, and that he later used as a buoyancy aid once Titanic went down.

The violin was discovered only by chance when the son of an amateur musician found it in his attic. It was given to his mother by her violin teacher and was left gathering dust.

The discovery was almost too good to be true, prompting experts to have the relic forensically examined by some of the most revered scientific bodies in Britain.

Now, after seven years of testing at a cost of tens of thousands of pounds, the water-stained violin has been proven to be the one played by Hartley on the night of the tragedy.

These pictures show how incredibly well-preserved the rose wood violin is despite its age and it being exposed to the sea for 10 days after the sinking.

There are two long cracks on its body that are said to have been opened up by moisture damage.

The photos also show the corroded engraved silver plate screwed onto the base of the fiddle that provided scientists with they key proof of its authenticity.

The historic violin, said to be worth a six figure sum, will go on public display at the Belfast City Hall, where Titanic was built, at the end of March.

Negotiations are also under way to exhibit it in museums around the world including America. It is likely to be auctioned off in the future.

Titanic experts have described it as the most important artefact associated with the infamous liner to have come to light.


I have the most massive History boner right now!

To put the size of the repertory [of the guitar] in perspective, the total number of manuscripts and printed books for the guitar from the seventeenth century alone, preserved in libraries throughout Europe and in the United States and Mexico, is substantially greater than the number for either Lute or keyboard. Regrettably, many of these sources have yet to be examined, few have been inventoried, and comparatively little has been done in the way of biographical concordance gathering.
The Guitar and Its Music: From the Renaissance to the Classical Era by James Tyler and Paul Sparks